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Customer service & advice: call 0845 527 1658 or email support@lubera.co.uk
Blurring the edible/ornamental divide with The Garden Forager

British gardens have long had a divide between edibles and ornamentals. The veg patch tends to be further from the house, shrouded from view by the pretty things. There’s always a sense that you can’t combine the two, but there is a different way to eat your garden, and that’s what Adele Nozedar explores in her book, The Garden Forager.

 

Burgeoning British Brambles

Burgeoning British Brambles

Unlike many of our European neighbours, the British don’t have a widespread culture of foraging for wild foods. Foraging has experienced a bit of a resurgence in recent years, as a way of really ‘getting back to nature’, but for most people I imagine their only real experience of foraging is picking blackberries.

 
Lubera 'Lowfruits' on The Beechgrove Garden!



The well loved BBC gardening programme, ‘Beechgrove Garden', has been growing some of our ‘Lowberry’ range in their wonderful miniature fruit garden.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=REaDaWDggS4

Our raspberry ‘Little Red Princess’ has been planted straight in the ground on the show, and has started suckering, so as noted by the presenters, it probably is better grown in a container. All of our ‘Lowberries’ are suitable for pots. A planter with good water drainage should always be used, this can be improved with additional holes and gravel in the bottom of the pot.

Our blueberry ‘Little Blue Wonder’ is looking wonderful on the show and promises a good, bountiful harvest! One of the most compact blueberries: it is only about 50 cm high. From the growth characteristic, it is more broad than high, making this compact blueberry perfect for dense area plantings or also as an underplanting for blueberries. So perfect for the ‘Beechgrove Garden’ miniature fruit area!

We look forward to seeing which other of our fruits will turn up on ‘Beechgrove Garden’!

 
Petal, Leaf, Seed - see your fruit trees differently

Do you think fruit trees only grow fruit? 'Petal, Leaf, Seed', a book by Lia Leendertz, helps us to see our gardens differently, and to delve into the secret larder of overlooked delicacies that are growing there. With wonderful recipes, this book guides you through harvests you've never dreamed of.

 
Frutilizer® - the fertiliser that bears fruit

Does there really need to be any more fertiliser? The market for fertiliser is more than just confusing. One has the feeling that each individual plant needs a special fertiliser, which is of course just as wrong as applying much too much fertiliser. This is exactly the real problem: that it is confusing how many fertilisers there are and that one then does not know exactly where and how to apply them…

 
The Fruitful Soil of Lubera

How is the Fruitful Soil used in pots and containers?

The Fruitful Soil No. 1, the potting soil for containers is, with its coarse and stable structure, made for pots or containers and can offer a suitable home for the roots of plants. We recommend repotting container plants using Fruitful Soil No.1 every four to five years.

 

Our new British blogger: Emma the Gardener

Our new British blogger: Emma the Gardener

Introducing our new British blogger: Emma Cooper, the Unconventional Gardener.
Hello! I’m Emma Cooper, and I’ve been blogging about kitchen gardening for *ahem* longer than I would care to mention, actually. My blog has moved around a bit, but I’m hoping that it will put down permanent roots in its current home - The Unconventional Gardener. On Twitter I’m @emmathegardener.

 

Boys, Berries ... and Baking!

Boys, Berries ... and Baking!

I have two boys that love the outdoors. What they like best is to play nearly all day in the yard, wander around and occasionally snack off our berry bushes. They know how to determine when the fruits are ripe and before we went on our summer vacation, they came to me with sad little eyes, after they noticed that the hundreds of unripe Bluedrop blueberries might actually be ready to harvest before we got back. “Mom, look at all these berries that we won’t get to eat!,” they exclaimed. I assured them that there would still be a few berries left once we arrived back home, of course, secretly hoping myself that this would be true!

 

The route to fruit Nirvana - from Naomi Slade

The route to fruit Nirvana - from Naomi Slade

The thing about tree fruit is that it is not a one-size-fits-all enthusiasm. For every community that is tracing its local orchard heritage, there are a dozen urban growers fitting dwarf trees into tiny spaces. For every grand residence restoring a genteely decaying orchard, there are a hundred young families getting to grips with a scruffy tree in a newly acquired garden.

 

Breeding progress - in a picture

Breeding progress - in a picture

They say it’s no coincidence: a picture is worth 1000 words. How often and how much have I written and preached about the benefits of breeding, about the added value of new varieties? And how many times must I still answer the question that many customers have: why don’t we offer old varieties in our assortment?

 

The Boskoop tree

The Boskoop tree

It 10 o’clock at night. I am driving on the highway between Bad Zwischenahn back to Buchs. There’s a missed call from my father on my phone. He is 86, and it’s important that I call back. Yes, there is news to report. The Boskoop tree outside his home, in front of my parents' house, had to be cut down.

 
THE EARLY APPLES PARADIS KATKA®AND PARADIS JULKA®

What do think about when you hear the words “early apples”?

 
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