Your opinion is important to us!

We are constantly making our site better and more user friendly for you. Any dispute, whether praise or criticism is important to us!

We welcome your suggestions!

Send

Feedback
Flat delivery fee £4.95, for all plants (excepted areas see here).
Customer service & advice: call 0845 527 1658 or email support@lubera.co.uk
 
 

Flowering quince

Buy a flowering quince at Lubera

When you buy a flowering quince, a brilliant spring appearance is guaranteed: its large, graceful, bowl-shaped flowers glow in red, rosé or white and have a fantastic long-distance effect.

   
 
No image available Flowering Japanese Quince 'Crimson and Gold'

Chaenomeles superba 'Crimson and Gold' forms bright, red flowers that develop into...

£19.40 *

Japanese Quince 'Cido'®

Chaenomeles japonica 'Cido' has orange/red flowers and large fruits

£19.40 *

Japanese Quince 'Friesdorfer Typ 205'

Chaenomeles speciosa 'Friesdorfer Typ 205'

£19.40 *

Japanese Quince 'Mango Storm'®

Chaenomeles speciosa 'Mango Storm'® has striking, red, double flowers

£19.40 *

Japanese Quince 'Nivalis'

Chaenomeles speciosa 'Nivalis' has white flowers and forms yellow fruits

£19.40 *

Japanese Quince 'Orange Storm'®

Chaenomeles speciosa 'Orange Storm'® has double, orange-red flowers

£19.40 *

Japanese Quince 'Pink Storm'®

Chaenomeles speciosa 'Pink Storm' has pink, double flowers

£19.40 *

Japanese Quince 'Scarlet Storm'®

Chaenomeles speciosa 'Scarlet Storm'® has red flowers, a compact habit and thornless...

£19.40 *

   
 

More information about flowering quince shrubs

 

The effect on pollinating insects is also not absent: the blossoms attract with a rich nectar offer, which inspires bumblebees and bees equally. Another attraction is expected in September: the aromatic, yellow fruits with their high vitamin C content can be processed into all kinds of delicacies. But even if the small, decorative quinces are not harvested, there are grateful buyers: birds appreciate them as a supplement to their winter menu.

 

An ornamental or mock quince, which originally comes from East Asia, is easy to care for care woody plant and absolutely frost hardy. It is also resistant to pruning and is, therefore, a wonderful hedge plant, especially the varieties of the vigorously growing Chinese ornamental quince (Chaenomeles speciosa). The plant also cuts a fine figure in the garden as a solitary plant, as an espalier plant and in large planters. The somewhat sparse growth of this ornamental shrub develops a very special aesthetic in combination with perennials. In principle, all species in the genus Chaenomeles are very well placed near a border, as their flowering spectacle can already be admired while the herbaceous representatives are still putting their energy into new shoots. Take a look at our rich Lubera® assortment and discover the large selection of flowering quince shrubs! 

 

 

Table of contents

 

Buy a flowering quince - enchanting flowers and sour fruits

Things to know

Location and care

Pruning

Edible fruits

 

Buy a flowering quince - enchanting flowers and sour fruits

 

In the Lubera® garden shop you will find flowering quince shrubs in different growth heights and flower colours. The original species form thorns, but there are also varieties available that have shed this characteristic. Here is a small selection of the available varieties:

 

The Japanese 'Cido' is an almost thornless selection that produces quite tasty fruits with a particularly high vitamin C content and is therefore also called 'Nordic lemon'.

The variety 'Nivalis' impresses with its white flowers from March to May and grows about 3 metres high.

‘Crimson and Gold' is a wide-growing and compact garden hybrid with lush, crimson-red flowers decorated with bright yellow stamens.

 

Things to know

 

Chinese and Japanese flowering quince shrubs (Chaenomeles speciosa or japonica) have been cultivated in Europe for about 200 years. The original species come from Japan, Myanmar and China. There are also crosses of the two species, which are called Chaenomeles x superba. Ornamental quinces form sparsely branched crowns which can become quite bulky over time. Their shoots have more or less strong thorns, depending on the species and variety. They are among the less demanding shrubs. They grow with strong roots deep into the ground, which makes them extremely sturdy and robust. The shrubs are self-pollinating, but another variety nearby can increase the fruit yield. Flowering quinces are also excellent as espalier plants in the garden if you bend their shoots in the desired direction and cut off unsuitable shoots.

 

Location and care

 

Flowering quinces love a sunny spot, but also thrive in partial shade. Ideally, the soil should be loamy and rich in nutrients - waterlogging should not exist. Compacted soil should be loosened as much as possible before planting, as it likes to develop deep roots. The best planting time is in October or April.

If the fruit quantity of the plants is rather meagre, this can be due to a too dry location. For this reason, you should water sufficiently during a dry period, possibly also in the winter months. In the spring, fertilisation should be carried out on a nutrient-poor soil - mulch and compost are generally beneficial.

 

Pruning

 

A flowering quince blooms on perennial wood and does not necessarily need to be cut. A strong pruning can be carried out, but this measure naturally impairs the abundance of flowers and fruit set. If you want a shapely hedge, you can use shears more often, however, this produces many new shoots.

A flowering quince will age in the course of time. The result is that fewer flowers and fruits are produced. It is therefore worthwhile to carry out a thinning measure every two to three years. Old branches should be removed close to the ground from the beginning to the middle of March. Shoots growing inwards should be removed above a younger side shoot. However, the shrub should not be shortened from above, as new shoots would then only occur there - bareness from below would be the result.

 

Edible fruits

 

When you buy this plant, you get a flowering beauty that also produces usable fruit (apple-like fruit). These grow to about 5 centimetres in size and are quite hard in the raw state. They must, therefore, be cooked before eating. The fruits can be processed into juice, liqueur and jelly. They have a fine bitter taste, so if necessary, they should be combined with other fruits. Apart from vitamin C, they contain a lot of pectins - so even without gelling agents, a jam or jelly is a success. Harvesting should take place shortly before the first severe frost. The aromatic scent of the fruits also allows you to draw conclusions about the degree of ripeness. After harvesting, you can store the small fruits for quite a long time.

Even if you do not process the fruits further, you can enjoy their fragrance. Placed in a bowl on the heater, they will spread their aroma around the room from there.

Tag cloud

 

Viewed